BOARD TALK
The fastest growing tennis discussion forum on the planet.


Post Reply 
The Williams Legacy
Author Message
RJD11 Offline
Major Winner
******

Posts: 1,063
Likes Given: 212
Likes Received: 192 in 133 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
The Williams Legacy
Wertheim wrote an interesting article called "The legacy of Venus and Serena Williams":

"Legacy is one of those words that gets heavy rotation in sports. And especially here at the U.S. Open, where the grounds are named for Billie Jean King and the main stadium is dedicated for Arthur Ashe. Legacy, though, is one of those words that obstinately resists definition, no matter how hard we try."

Click the link below for more:

Read More: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/tennis/...z2daYzLqlZ
(This post was last modified: 01-Sep-2013 10:34 AM by tented.)
31-Aug-2013 05:35 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
RJD11 Offline
Major Winner
******

Posts: 1,063
Likes Given: 212
Likes Received: 192 in 133 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
Interview with Patrick Mourataglou on Serena

Richard Williams

IT: Was it the greatest sports prediction ever when Richard Williams said that both of his daughters would become No. 1 players?

PM: I wouldnâ€t say that itâ€s the greatest prediction, I would say that heâ€s the greatest coach of all time.

From what I know, no one else in the history of sports raised two different children to become No. 1.
02-Sep-2013 06:27 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
RJD11 Offline
Major Winner
******

Posts: 1,063
Likes Given: 212
Likes Received: 192 in 133 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
Is Serena Williams heading to The Voice soon? Looks like sheâ€s already done a dry run of her audition.

CeeLo Green, a judge on the NBC talent show, revealed on Conan on Wednesday that Williams insisted on singing for him when the two saw each other at an NFL game between the Falcons and Dolphins two weeks ago in Miami. (Williams owns a small stake in the Dolphins.)

Music, tennis donâ€t always mix, but they keep trying

Williams asked to sing for him, according to Green, but not before he turned his back to her, like he does on the show, where hopefuls are judged solely on their voice and not how they look. After a few nervous false starts, she finally gave him a rendition of Oleta Adams†Get Here.

So how did Serena fare?

“You know what, it really wasnâ€t bad,” Green said. “Sheâ€s got a very decent voice. Sheâ€s cool.”



http://tennis.si.com/2013/10/03/serena-w...t=tn_t2_a6
03-Oct-2013 04:41 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Kieran Offline
Running around the backhand...
*********

Posts: 11,428
Likes Given: 6,967
Likes Received: 4,546 in 2,998 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
I read the article, RJD11, a very good point about how sometimes the WS legacy is confined to their own demographic, when really they're inspiring players of all nationalities. And yeah, Richard Williams is some man to have taught the two of them, and they both reached the top...

Approved
05-Oct-2013 03:54 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
RJD11 Offline
Major Winner
******

Posts: 1,063
Likes Given: 212
Likes Received: 192 in 133 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
(05-Oct-2013 03:54 PM)Kieran Wrote:  I read the article, RJD11, a very good point about how sometimes the WS legacy is confined to their own demographic, when really they're inspiring players of all nationalities. And yeah, Richard Williams is some man to have taught the two of them, and they both reached the top...

Its ludicrous to think that only African-American players

were influenced by the Williams Sisters.



Yes, Richards accomplishment is often over shadowed

by his perceived demeanor.
(This post was last modified: 05-Oct-2013 11:43 PM by RJD11.)
05-Oct-2013 11:36 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Moxie629 Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 9,429
Likes Given: 3,414
Likes Received: 2,277 in 1,599 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
(05-Oct-2013 11:36 PM)RJD11 Wrote:  
(05-Oct-2013 03:54 PM)Kieran Wrote:  I read the article, RJD11, a very good point about how sometimes the WS legacy is confined to their own demographic, when really they're inspiring players of all nationalities. And yeah, Richard Williams is some man to have taught the two of them, and they both reached the top...

Its ludicrous to think that only African-American players

were influenced by the Williams Sisters.

Yes, Richards accomplishment is often over shadowed

by his perceived demeanor.

To me, as a woman, I think their first influence is on women in sports. There were African-American players before them who broke the barriers, though I wouldn't diminish what they still had to overcome. However, they really showed what superior athletes women could be, and to me that is the legacy.

And I think anyone paying attention appreciates Richard's influence on them. (And by the way, Rauza Islanova, the mother of Marat Safin and Dinara Safina also did raise 2 children to be #1. She was a tennis coach, and pushed them both into it, and coached them to some success, but not necessarily for the better.)
06-Oct-2013 09:23 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
tossip Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 3,644
Likes Given: 248
Likes Received: 248 in 216 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
The Sisters showed the world that its possible to succeed against all odds ,taught young girls to be fearless and go for your dreams.Venus and Serena have taught the world that family is very important..they love each other no matter what and the love between them and their Dad is endearing.
The sisters are warriors and they never give up or give in...thats a mark of champions.
They changed the game in many ways and women tennis popularity went up from 1999 to 2003,prime time tennis was introduced because of the sisters.Equal prize money is another achievement..
All these young players players of color started because of the sisters...Madison Keys saw Venus playing and Sloane started at 9yrs when the sisters were at the peak in the early 2002s..maybe the mother saw the checks the sisters were banking.
07-Oct-2013 09:57 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes tossip's post:
RJD11 (10-11-2013)
RJD11 Offline
Major Winner
******

Posts: 1,063
Likes Given: 212
Likes Received: 192 in 133 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
Sisters' influence in full effect

By Jane McManus | Jan 9, 2014
espnW.com


Taylor Townsend remembers watching Venus Williams play her younger sister, Serena, from her television set. Townsend was little, just beginning to play herself, but she noticed the drama of the points, the outfits they wore. With a shoot-for-the-moon confidence that a young child can have, Townsend told her uncle she was going to be better than the Williams sisters.

If Townsend had been born a decade earlier instead of in 1996, she would have had more difficulty finding two women she could identify with quite so strongly. When she watched them play, she saw women who looked like her and who she wanted to emulate.

"It is a legacy," Townsend said. "They paved the way for a lot of female athletes in general and broke down barriers for African-American athletes."

By 2012, Townsend was the top-ranked junior girl in the world; now, at age 17, she's about to embark on her first full year on the WTA Tour.

Venus and Serena may have had no idea they were having such an effect on girls like Townsend. By the time Townsend picked up a racket, she didn't care about the weeds springing up through the baseline cracks of her public courts in Chicago. She just wanted to play.

So did Sachia Vickery and Victoria Duval, two other young African-American women among the top American juniors on the rise who have pointed to the Williams sisters as inspirations.

"The lesson of the Williams sisters: anything is possible," Townsend's mother, Sheila, said. "It's not unattainable just because of your social or economic background or where you grew up. These things don't have to hold you back."

In the 16 years since a 17-year-old Venus reached her first U.S. Open final in 1997, the demographics of the top American juniors have changed.

"It's beginning to look a lot more like America," said former pro player and current ESPN analyst Patrick McEnroe, who also works as the USTA's general manager of player development.

It's an interesting moment in the women's game. Serena Williams and Sloane Stephens are ranked within the top 20 heading into the Australian Open, which begins Monday. With so many other talented women in the mix (Jamie Hampton and Madison Keys, to name a few), it's like the orchestra is starting to tune up on the opening night of the next great era of American women's tennis.

"There's no question that the Williams sisters have had a profound effect on bringing women into the game, especially African-American women," USTA executive director Gordon Smith said.

Not only are more women of color playing tennis at an elite level, but there also are women from a wider variety of backgrounds playing. There are daughters of immigrants and daughters of privilege -- all with the same opportunities to play.

And the USTA has been a conduit for this new crop of players. Last summer, the organization released a brochure to introduce the next generation to the public. If you looked at the cover's collage of headshots, you'd notice quickly that the faces of American women's tennis have changed in the nearly two decades since the Williams sisters started playing. And it's not just at the top of the rankings; participation rates of minority players continued to rise in 2012, according to USTA data.

There are tremendous stories here. Christina McHale learned to speak fluent Spanish from her mother, who is from Cuba, and lived in Asia as a child. Duval is the daughter of a Haitian doctor, who returned to the country after the 2010 earthquake to help the injured and was nearly killed when a building collapsed.

"It goes way beyond black and white, I think," said Nefertiti A. Walker, an assistant professor at UMass' Isenberg School of Management. "It goes to socio-economic status. They came from humble beginnings, with lessons from their father because they couldn't afford private lessons."

Role models are one thing, but Walker points out that you also need access to a sport to create a truly level playing field. She remembers that tennis became part of the physical education curriculum at her own neighborhood school in Atlanta after the Williams sisters reached prominence.

"Definitely the powers that be saw that this was an opportunity for them," Walker said.

That outreach continues, as the USTA puts money into grassroots programs held at public courts, or provides money for rent time on indoor courts across the country.

"We're working very hard to increase the opportunities and to succeed we've got to get more young kids into the game," Smith said. "Our Manhattan Project is growing the participation of young kids before they turn to baseball and other sports."

Venus has influenced those plans as she has become more active in the politics of tennis.

"Venus has been a great ambassador for the game," Smith said. "She's worked for us on several appearances. She's consulted with us so we understand better how to find talent, how to develop talent."

The Williams sisters may motivate some of the kids (and just as likely their parents) to pick up a racket and play, but USTA also has evolved, coming up with new ways to keep the newcomers engaged.



http://espn.go.com/espnw/news-commentary...-seen-2014
09-Jan-2014 06:14 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes RJD11's post:
Tenfan63 (01-09-2014)
Calvy Offline
Masters Titleist
*****

Posts: 905
Likes Given: 0
Likes Received: 160 in 122 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: The Williams Legacy
And the fact that you see so many young American prospects whom are of African American descent in the sport, is because of the success of the sisters.

Fact is, when I was growing up, we, African American juniors, viewed tennis as a avenue to acquire a scholarship into colleges and universities, but, now young players see a potential successful tennis career is possible, and a lot of that has to be attributed to the sisters.

As far as player's whom are not black who were influenced by the sister's, you're more likely to hear a player from another country profess they were inspired and grew up admiring the sister's than u are from someone not African American whom is American.

I believe Azarenka stated Serena was the player she admired prior to joining the tour.
10-Jan-2014 12:45 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Calvy's post:
RJD11 (01-10-2014)
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)