BOARD TALK
The fastest growing tennis discussion forum on the planet.


Post Reply 
Glance at the US men post Roddick era
Author Message
herios Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 5,288
Likes Given: 316
Likes Received: 1,709 in 1,243 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
Glance at the US men post Roddick era
When I heard at Wimbledon that the US men recorded their worst showing in 100 years, I thought would be interesting analyzing what is next or the US men in tennis and are there any signs of getting out of this hole?

I pulled the top 10 US guys currently in the rankings. Here they are:

Isner ranked 20
Querrey 22
-------------------
Fish 64
Blake 77
Russell 93
-------------------
Sock 94
S. Johnson 101
Harrison 107
Kudla 109
R. Williams 116

So the big picture is quite bleak with ONLY 6 players in the top 100. I cannot remember ever so few americans in the top 100.
I grouped them into 3 clusters, because you may analyze them this way as a group:
1. The first cluster, the twin towers. I predicted about 3 years ago, when they were 3/4 in US behind Roddick and Fish that they will be the top americans in a few years and here they are. Big John was once in the top 10 briefly following his surprising IW final last year, but that is about it. Sam was never in the top 15 yet, only 20, but he is younger. I do think that the top 10 is a stretch for him, as he is too defensive for his stature. So the 2 of them are about at their best or close to it anyway, I doubt they will have a too much upside in the future.

2. the next cluster, the veterans. Mardy might resurge once if he will be healthy, but there is a big question mark over his health. Blake and Russell are still around, in this era when players seems to like to stretch their career into the mid 30's, but as far as great results, it will not happen

3. the next cluster is the "next generation".
these are those who will carry the torch once they join the current top 2 americans, but they are still a long way to go. Harrison had a surge last year, but he fell back badly and now has been caught up on by the other up and comers.
Who will be able to elevate from this group? Who is the most talented?
I think is anybody's game, and they are all around 21-22. Time will tell, but I bet the great American players are watching these young men and they cannot believe it how little is now left to cheer for as of now. I am not American, but it is quite sad.
03-Aug-2013 10:36 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Clay Death Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 3,280
Likes Given: 62
Likes Received: 125 in 102 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
isner will hit top #15 if he wins this citi open title.


overall the American picture is quite bleak.

[Image: forum%20sig-800_zps8nhvcahj.jpg]
03-Aug-2013 10:50 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
GameSetAndMath Offline
Potential GOAT
*********

Posts: 12,024
Likes Given: 2,228
Likes Received: 3,113 in 2,199 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
Why is Sam Querry not even playing in Montreal despite being
eligible? Injury or laziness?

"Never argue with a fool; onlookers may not be able to tell the difference" - Mark Twain
03-Aug-2013 11:03 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Clay Death Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 3,280
Likes Given: 62
Likes Received: 125 in 102 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
I have no idea general gamesetmath.


perhaps he is carrying a small injury.

[Image: forum%20sig-800_zps8nhvcahj.jpg]
03-Aug-2013 11:04 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
GameSetAndMath Offline
Potential GOAT
*********

Posts: 12,024
Likes Given: 2,228
Likes Received: 3,113 in 2,199 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(03-Aug-2013 10:36 PM)herios Wrote:  When I heard at Wimbledon that the US men recorded their worst showing in 100 years, I thought would be interesting analyzing what is next or the US men in tennis and are there any signs of getting out of this hole?

I pulled the top 10 US guys currently in the rankings. Here they are:

Isner ranked 20
Querrey 22
-------------------
Fish 64
Blake 77
Russell 93
-------------------
Sock 94
S. Johnson 101
Harrison 107
Kudla 109
R. Williams 116

So the big picture is quite bleak with ONLY 6 players in the top 100. I cannot remember ever so few americans in the top 100.
I grouped them into 3 clusters, because you may analyze them this way as a group:
1. The first cluster, the twin towers. I predicted about 3 years ago, when they were 3/4 in US behind Roddick and Fish that they will be the top americans in a few years and here they are. Big John was once in the top 10 briefly following his surprising IW final last year, but that is about it. Sam was never in the top 15 yet, only 20, but he is younger. I do think that the top 10 is a stretch for him, as he is too defensive for his stature. So the 2 of them are about at their best or close to it anyway, I doubt they will have a too much upside in the future.

2. the next cluster, the veterans. Mardy might resurge once if he will be healthy, but there is a big question mark over his health. Blake and Russell are still around, in this era when players seems to like to stretch their career into the mid 30's, but as far as great results, it will not happen

3. the next cluster is the "next generation".
these are those who will carry the torch once they join the current top 2 americans, but they are still a long way to go. Harrison had a surge last year, but he fell back badly and now has been caught up on by the other up and comers.
Who will be able to elevate from this group? Who is the most talented?
I think is anybody's game, and they are all around 21-22. Time will tell, but I bet the great American players are watching these young men and they cannot believe it how little is now left to cheer for as of now. I am not American, but it is quite sad.

Among these is some one who has already won a grand slam Cool
and I think he is probably the
best bet for being the torch bearer of US Men's Tennis in a few
years. Name him for extra credit.

"Never argue with a fool; onlookers may not be able to tell the difference" - Mark Twain
03-Aug-2013 11:08 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Fiero425 Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 4,578
Likes Given: 2,881
Likes Received: 780 in 617 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(03-Aug-2013 11:08 PM)GameSetAndMath Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 10:36 PM)herios Wrote:  When I heard at Wimbledon that the US men recorded their worst showing in 100 years, I thought would be interesting analyzing what is next or the US men in tennis and are there any signs of getting out of this hole?

I pulled the top 10 US guys currently in the rankings. Here they are:

Isner ranked 20
Querrey 22
-------------------
Fish 64
Blake 77
Russell 93
-------------------
Sock 94
S. Johnson 101
Harrison 107
Kudla 109
R. Williams 116

So the big picture is quite bleak with ONLY 6 players in the top 100. I cannot remember ever so few americans in the top 100.
I grouped them into 3 clusters, because you may analyze them this way as a group:

Among these is some one who has already won a grand slam Cool
and I think he is probably the
best bet for being the torch bearer of US Men's Tennis in a few
years. Name him for extra credit.

It's been sad here in the States for years even before Roddick retired! We don't have elite players on the men's side of the game and no real prospects! Harrison won't get there, Querrey or Isner definitely aren't even hopeful! I just don't see anything good turning it around; anytime soon!

"Kneel before your master! Fool; You Are No Longer My Equal! I AM More Than Man, More Than LIFE; I AM A GOD!" Skeletor to He-Man in Masters Of The Universe
(This post was last modified: 03-Aug-2013 11:34 PM by Fiero425.)
03-Aug-2013 11:32 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Clay Death Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 3,280
Likes Given: 62
Likes Received: 125 in 102 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
best athletes are going into football, baseball, and basketball. and why not. these sports pay a lot more. team sports are popular for a lot of reasons here in America.

and now soccer is immensely popular in America.

[Image: forum%20sig-800_zps8nhvcahj.jpg]
(This post was last modified: 04-Aug-2013 12:01 AM by Clay Death.)
04-Aug-2013 12:00 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
1972Murat Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 8,513
Likes Given: 2,152
Likes Received: 3,161 in 1,854 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
I think American tennis could use a serious, somewhat nasty local rivalry first before world domination...something like JMac-Connors, or Pete-Andre....just to generate interest among kids and those who stopped caring after Pete retired.

04-Aug-2013 07:59 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Clay Death Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 3,280
Likes Given: 62
Likes Received: 125 in 102 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
they need to get off the hard courts. hard courts don't make champions.

you have to raise them on clay.


either that or send them to the very best tennis academies in spain, france, and Germany.


but that is only a part of the problem. best athletes have figured out that tennis is a little too hard and the return on investment is not really there. very tough to make the mega bucks in tennis.


you can make millions here just sitting on the bench in team sports here. and 70,000-100,000 people come to watch you sit or play. and you are on national television every week.

team sports is where it is at for the americans. according to their thinking, that is what prepares their kids best for life. team sports teaches you to get along and it teaches you the principles of leadership and management.

so they start them off very early in life with team sports.

[Image: forum%20sig-800_zps8nhvcahj.jpg]
(This post was last modified: 04-Aug-2013 09:37 AM by Clay Death.)
04-Aug-2013 09:36 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
herios Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 5,288
Likes Given: 316
Likes Received: 1,709 in 1,243 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 09:36 AM)Clay Death Wrote:  they need to get off the hard courts. hard courts don't make champions.

you have to raise them on clay.


either that or send them to the very best tennis academies in spain, france, and Germany.


but that is only a part of the problem. best athletes have figured out that tennis is a little too hard and the return on investment is not really there. very tough to make the mega bucks in tennis.


you can make millions here just sitting on the bench in team sports here. and 70,000-100,000 people come to watch you sit or play. and you are on national television every week.

team sports is where it is at for the americans. according to their thinking, that is what prepares their kids best for life. team sports teaches you to get along and it teaches you the principles of leadership and management.

so they start them off very early in life with team sports.

Team sports is an easy and lame excuse. Sorry. Those were the favored sports in US also 20-40 years ago, when US dominated the tennis world.
And why is US still capable to produce world class athletes in individual sports like track& field or swimming? Why those didn't choose hockey, basketball or baseball or football?
04-Aug-2013 10:13 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
herios Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 5,288
Likes Given: 316
Likes Received: 1,709 in 1,243 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 07:59 AM)1972Murat Wrote:  I think American tennis could use a serious, somewhat nasty local rivalry first before world domination...something like JMac-Connors, or Pete-Andre....just to generate interest among kids and those who stopped caring after Pete retired.

Considering how many of them are closely bunched up together around the 100-120 spots, some rivalries might happen and light some fire under their bellies.
It will be interesting to hear the narrative at the USO in the commentators booth.
I am also curious which of these players will get the wc to get into the main draw.
04-Aug-2013 10:32 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
DarthFed Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 7,331
Likes Given: 830
Likes Received: 1,947 in 1,281 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 07:59 AM)1972Murat Wrote:  I think American tennis could use a serious, somewhat nasty local rivalry first before world domination...something like JMac-Connors, or Pete-Andre....just to generate interest among kids and those who stopped caring after Pete retired.

I think this is a good point. In sports we Americans like to latch onto a good sports story. An interesting and dynamic rivalry between a couple Americans could make the sport a lot more popular here. At this point I question whether or not the rare GS champion would help that much..meaning an American who comes out of nowhere and wins a slam in the next 3-5 years. A good rivalry at or very near the top and/or a dominant #1 is what would likely revive American tennis.
04-Aug-2013 11:35 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Fiero425 Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 4,578
Likes Given: 2,881
Likes Received: 780 in 617 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 10:32 AM)herios Wrote:  
(04-Aug-2013 07:59 AM)1972Murat Wrote:  I think American tennis could use a serious, somewhat nasty local rivalry first before world domination...something like JMac-Connors, or Pete-Andre....just to generate interest among kids and those who stopped caring after Pete retired.

Considering how many of them are closely bunched up together around the 100-120 spots, some rivalries might happen and light some fire under their bellies.
It will be interesting to hear the narrative at the USO in the commentators booth.
I am also curious which of these players will get the wc to get into the main draw.

You couldn't get much closer with Querrey and Isner ranked at #19 and #20 for quite a while! If only it did what you suggested; 2 towering, dominating type players! Too bad injuries are their achilles heels; no pun intended!

"Kneel before your master! Fool; You Are No Longer My Equal! I AM More Than Man, More Than LIFE; I AM A GOD!" Skeletor to He-Man in Masters Of The Universe
(This post was last modified: 04-Aug-2013 11:49 AM by Fiero425.)
04-Aug-2013 11:40 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
tented Offline
Potential GOAT
*********

Posts: 11,618
Likes Given: 4,705
Likes Received: 3,392 in 2,108 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 09:36 AM)Clay Death Wrote:  they need to get off the hard courts. hard courts don't make champions.

you have to raise them on clay.

either that or send them to the very best tennis academies in spain, france, and Germany.

I've heard Patrick McEnroe talk about adding clay courts to the USTA center in New York, but I don't know if it ever happened. But in other words, he's thinking along these same lines, and recognizes the advantages of training on clay. This is very smart of him.

Considering 3 out of 9 Masters are played on clay, and 1 out of 4 GSs, that's 4 out of 13 of the big tournaments each year taking place on a surface the US players practically write off. We'll never get another No. 1 unless they take seriously the surface on which nearly a third of the big tournaments occur, and came become truly competitive.

If you add Wimbledon, approximately 40% don't take place on a hardcourt. And with Roddick now retired we saw what happened there this year, making history in the worst possible way.

Sure, the USO, plus the IW, Miami, and Cincinnati Masters are in the US, but they're not the whole story, and it's time US players realize that.
04-Aug-2013 02:53 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Fiero425 Offline
Grand Slam Champion
*******

Posts: 4,578
Likes Given: 2,881
Likes Received: 780 in 617 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 02:53 PM)tented Wrote:  
(04-Aug-2013 09:36 AM)Clay Death Wrote:  they need to get off the hard courts. hard courts don't make champions.

you have to raise them on clay.

either that or send them to the very best tennis academies in spain, france, and Germany.

I've heard Patrick McEnroe talk about adding clay courts to the USTA center in New York, but I don't know if it ever happened. But in other words, he's thinking along these same lines, and recognizes the advantages of training on clay. This is very smart of him.

Considering 3 out of 9 Masters are played on clay, and 1 out of 4 GSs, that's 4 out of 13 of the big tournaments each year taking place on a surface the US players practically write off. We'll never get another No. 1 unless they take seriously the surface on which nearly a third of the big tournaments occur, and came become truly competitive.

If you add Wimbledon, approximately 40% don't take place on a hardcourt. And with Roddick now retired we saw what happened there this year, making history in the worst possible way.

Sure, the USO, plus the IW, Miami, and Cincinnati Masters are in the US, but they're not the whole story, and it's time US players realize that.

We hurt ourselves with that schitzo period changing from grass to clay to the current hardcourt back in the 70's at the USO! Kids still played and trained on clay; except in California of course and I think that hurt us serious when it came to our juniors and the future of elite players! Clay is best for training; keeping ball in play, strategy at a premium, and not so hard on the body! Hard for me to say since I was brought up on cement, but I only reached city and state status!

"Kneel before your master! Fool; You Are No Longer My Equal! I AM More Than Man, More Than LIFE; I AM A GOD!" Skeletor to He-Man in Masters Of The Universe
(This post was last modified: 04-Aug-2013 03:15 PM by Fiero425.)
04-Aug-2013 03:14 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Moxie629 Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 9,429
Likes Given: 3,414
Likes Received: 2,277 in 1,599 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(03-Aug-2013 11:08 PM)GameSetAndMath Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 10:36 PM)herios Wrote:  When I heard at Wimbledon that the US men recorded their worst showing in 100 years, I thought would be interesting analyzing what is next or the US men in tennis and are there any signs of getting out of this hole?

I pulled the top 10 US guys currently in the rankings. Here they are:

Isner ranked 20
Querrey 22
-------------------
Fish 64
Blake 77
Russell 93
-------------------
Sock 94
S. Johnson 101
Harrison 107
Kudla 109
R. Williams 116

So the big picture is quite bleak with ONLY 6 players in the top 100. I cannot remember ever so few americans in the top 100.
I grouped them into 3 clusters, because you may analyze them this way as a group:
1. The first cluster, the twin towers. I predicted about 3 years ago, when they were 3/4 in US behind Roddick and Fish that they will be the top americans in a few years and here they are. Big John was once in the top 10 briefly following his surprising IW final last year, but that is about it. Sam was never in the top 15 yet, only 20, but he is younger. I do think that the top 10 is a stretch for him, as he is too defensive for his stature. So the 2 of them are about at their best or close to it anyway, I doubt they will have a too much upside in the future.

2. the next cluster, the veterans. Mardy might resurge once if he will be healthy, but there is a big question mark over his health. Blake and Russell are still around, in this era when players seems to like to stretch their career into the mid 30's, but as far as great results, it will not happen

3. the next cluster is the "next generation".
these are those who will carry the torch once they join the current top 2 americans, but they are still a long way to go. Harrison had a surge last year, but he fell back badly and now has been caught up on by the other up and comers.
Who will be able to elevate from this group? Who is the most talented?
I think is anybody's game, and they are all around 21-22. Time will tell, but I bet the great American players are watching these young men and they cannot believe it how little is now left to cheer for as of now. I am not American, but it is quite sad.

Among these is some one who has already won a grand slam Cool
and I think he is probably the
best bet for being the torch bearer of US Men's Tennis in a few
years. Name him for extra credit.

Did Jack Sock win Jrs at USO? I didn't look it up, but I figured you were going Jrs. That's my memory, so could be wrong.
04-Aug-2013 04:12 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Moxie629 Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 9,429
Likes Given: 3,414
Likes Received: 2,277 in 1,599 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 02:53 PM)tented Wrote:  
(04-Aug-2013 09:36 AM)Clay Death Wrote:  they need to get off the hard courts. hard courts don't make champions.

you have to raise them on clay.

either that or send them to the very best tennis academies in spain, france, and Germany.

I've heard Patrick McEnroe talk about adding clay courts to the USTA center in New York, but I don't know if it ever happened. But in other words, he's thinking along these same lines, and recognizes the advantages of training on clay. This is very smart of him.

Considering 3 out of 9 Masters are played on clay, and 1 out of 4 GSs, that's 4 out of 13 of the big tournaments each year taking place on a surface the US players practically write off. We'll never get another No. 1 unless they take seriously the surface on which nearly a third of the big tournaments occur, and came become truly competitive.

If you add Wimbledon, approximately 40% don't take place on a hardcourt. And with Roddick now retired we saw what happened there this year, making history in the worst possible way.

Sure, the USO, plus the IW, Miami, and Cincinnati Masters are in the US, but they're not the whole story, and it's time US players realize that.

Not sure about clay at the USTA, but John McEnroe has 10 clay courts at his new tennis center on Randall's Island, and Emilio Sanchez Vicario teaches the kids at least partly on clay at his academy in FL. (Where they can also get an international baccalaureate degree as their HS diploma, btw.) Both have spoken about the need for US kids to come up more on clay, and have done something about it.
04-Aug-2013 04:29 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
GameSetAndMath Offline
Potential GOAT
*********

Posts: 12,024
Likes Given: 2,228
Likes Received: 3,113 in 2,199 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 04:12 PM)Moxie629 Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 11:08 PM)GameSetAndMath Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 10:36 PM)herios Wrote:  When I heard at Wimbledon that the US men recorded their worst showing in 100 years, I thought would be interesting analyzing what is next or the US men in tennis and are there any signs of getting out of this hole?

I pulled the top 10 US guys currently in the rankings. Here they are:

Isner ranked 20
Querrey 22
-------------------
Fish 64
Blake 77
Russell 93
-------------------
Sock 94
S. Johnson 101
Harrison 107
Kudla 109
R. Williams 116

So the big picture is quite bleak with ONLY 6 players in the top 100. I cannot remember ever so few americans in the top 100.
I grouped them into 3 clusters, because you may analyze them this way as a group:
1. The first cluster, the twin towers. I predicted about 3 years ago, when they were 3/4 in US behind Roddick and Fish that they will be the top americans in a few years and here they are. Big John was once in the top 10 briefly following his surprising IW final last year, but that is about it. Sam was never in the top 15 yet, only 20, but he is younger. I do think that the top 10 is a stretch for him, as he is too defensive for his stature. So the 2 of them are about at their best or close to it anyway, I doubt they will have a too much upside in the future.

2. the next cluster, the veterans. Mardy might resurge once if he will be healthy, but there is a big question mark over his health. Blake and Russell are still around, in this era when players seems to like to stretch their career into the mid 30's, but as far as great results, it will not happen

3. the next cluster is the "next generation".
these are those who will carry the torch once they join the current top 2 americans, but they are still a long way to go. Harrison had a surge last year, but he fell back badly and now has been caught up on by the other up and comers.
Who will be able to elevate from this group? Who is the most talented?
I think is anybody's game, and they are all around 21-22. Time will tell, but I bet the great American players are watching these young men and they cannot believe it how little is now left to cheer for as of now. I am not American, but it is quite sad.

Among these is some one who has already won a grand slam Cool
and I think he is probably the
best bet for being the torch bearer of US Men's Tennis in a few
years. Name him for extra credit.

Did Jack Sock win Jrs at USO? I didn't look it up, but I figured you were going Jrs. That's my memory, so could be wrong.

No, I am not talking about Juniors event.
Jack Sock won the Mixed Doubles US Open title in 2011 playing
along with Melanie Oudin. I guess technically that is a grand slam
title.

"Never argue with a fool; onlookers may not be able to tell the difference" - Mark Twain
04-Aug-2013 04:33 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Moxie629 Offline
Multiple Slam Winner
********

Posts: 9,429
Likes Given: 3,414
Likes Received: 2,277 in 1,599 posts
Joined: Apr 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 04:33 PM)GameSetAndMath Wrote:  
(04-Aug-2013 04:12 PM)Moxie629 Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 11:08 PM)GameSetAndMath Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 10:36 PM)herios Wrote:  When I heard at Wimbledon that the US men recorded their worst showing in 100 years, I thought would be interesting analyzing what is next or the US men in tennis and are there any signs of getting out of this hole?

I pulled the top 10 US guys currently in the rankings. Here they are:

Isner ranked 20
Querrey 22
-------------------
Fish 64
Blake 77
Russell 93
-------------------
Sock 94
S. Johnson 101
Harrison 107
Kudla 109
R. Williams 116

So the big picture is quite bleak with ONLY 6 players in the top 100. I cannot remember ever so few americans in the top 100.
I grouped them into 3 clusters, because you may analyze them this way as a group:
1. The first cluster, the twin towers. I predicted about 3 years ago, when they were 3/4 in US behind Roddick and Fish that they will be the top americans in a few years and here they are. Big John was once in the top 10 briefly following his surprising IW final last year, but that is about it. Sam was never in the top 15 yet, only 20, but he is younger. I do think that the top 10 is a stretch for him, as he is too defensive for his stature. So the 2 of them are about at their best or close to it anyway, I doubt they will have a too much upside in the future.

2. the next cluster, the veterans. Mardy might resurge once if he will be healthy, but there is a big question mark over his health. Blake and Russell are still around, in this era when players seems to like to stretch their career into the mid 30's, but as far as great results, it will not happen

3. the next cluster is the "next generation".
these are those who will carry the torch once they join the current top 2 americans, but they are still a long way to go. Harrison had a surge last year, but he fell back badly and now has been caught up on by the other up and comers.
Who will be able to elevate from this group? Who is the most talented?
I think is anybody's game, and they are all around 21-22. Time will tell, but I bet the great American players are watching these young men and they cannot believe it how little is now left to cheer for as of now. I am not American, but it is quite sad.

Among these is some one who has already won a grand slam Cool
and I think he is probably the
best bet for being the torch bearer of US Men's Tennis in a few
years. Name him for extra credit.

Did Jack Sock win Jrs at USO? I didn't look it up, but I figured you were going Jrs. That's my memory, so could be wrong.

No, I am not talking about Juniors event.
Jack Sock won the Mixed Doubles US Open title in 2011 playing
along with Melanie Oudin. I guess technically that is a grand slam
title.

OK, I was close, though! My memory was that the first time I heard about Sock as any kind of future of US tennis was for getting some title at the USO...I was guessing Jrs. I did say I didn't look it up, though, so that must give me a few points. Big Smile Anyway, good trivia question, and yes, he does have a Slam trophy. John McEnroe's first slam win was mixed doubles with Mary Carillo when he was 18, at the French Open.
04-Aug-2013 04:38 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
GameSetAndMath Offline
Potential GOAT
*********

Posts: 12,024
Likes Given: 2,228
Likes Received: 3,113 in 2,199 posts
Joined: Jul 2013
RE: Glance at the US men post Roddick era
(04-Aug-2013 04:38 PM)Moxie629 Wrote:  
(04-Aug-2013 04:33 PM)GameSetAndMath Wrote:  
(04-Aug-2013 04:12 PM)Moxie629 Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 11:08 PM)GameSetAndMath Wrote:  
(03-Aug-2013 10:36 PM)herios Wrote:  When I heard at Wimbledon that the US men recorded their worst showing in 100 years, I thought would be interesting analyzing what is next or the US men in tennis and are there any signs of getting out of this hole?

I pulled the top 10 US guys currently in the rankings. Here they are:

Isner ranked 20
Querrey 22
-------------------
Fish 64
Blake 77
Russell 93
-------------------
Sock 94
S. Johnson 101
Harrison 107
Kudla 109
R. Williams 116

So the big picture is quite bleak with ONLY 6 players in the top 100. I cannot remember ever so few americans in the top 100.
I grouped them into 3 clusters, because you may analyze them this way as a group:
1. The first cluster, the twin towers. I predicted about 3 years ago, when they were 3/4 in US behind Roddick and Fish that they will be the top americans in a few years and here they are. Big John was once in the top 10 briefly following his surprising IW final last year, but that is about it. Sam was never in the top 15 yet, only 20, but he is younger. I do think that the top 10 is a stretch for him, as he is too defensive for his stature. So the 2 of them are about at their best or close to it anyway, I doubt they will have a too much upside in the future.

2. the next cluster, the veterans. Mardy might resurge once if he will be healthy, but there is a big question mark over his health. Blake and Russell are still around, in this era when players seems to like to stretch their career into the mid 30's, but as far as great results, it will not happen

3. the next cluster is the "next generation".
these are those who will carry the torch once they join the current top 2 americans, but they are still a long way to go. Harrison had a surge last year, but he fell back badly and now has been caught up on by the other up and comers.
Who will be able to elevate from this group? Who is the most talented?
I think is anybody's game, and they are all around 21-22. Time will tell, but I bet the great American players are watching these young men and they cannot believe it how little is now left to cheer for as of now. I am not American, but it is quite sad.

Among these is some one who has already won a grand slam Cool
and I think he is probably the
best bet for being the torch bearer of US Men's Tennis in a few
years. Name him for extra credit.

Did Jack Sock win Jrs at USO? I didn't look it up, but I figured you were going Jrs. That's my memory, so could be wrong.

No, I am not talking about Juniors event.
Jack Sock won the Mixed Doubles US Open title in 2011 playing
along with Melanie Oudin. I guess technically that is a grand slam
title.

OK, I was close, though! My memory was that the first time I heard about Sock as any kind of future of US tennis was for getting some title at the USO...I was guessing Jrs. I did say I didn't look it up, though, so that must give me a few points. Big Smile Anyway, good trivia question, and yes, he does have a Slam trophy. John McEnroe's first slam win was mixed doubles with Mary Carillo when he was 18, at the French Open.

You did a good job of singling out the one person who has
grand slam trophy out of the 10 listed without looking up, even
though the event is not correctly identified. You get A-.

"Never argue with a fool; onlookers may not be able to tell the difference" - Mark Twain
04-Aug-2013 06:40 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)